Written by admin on February 6, 2017 in Regulations

Reporting of Accidents

Effective January 1, 2015

 

The rule expands the list of severe work-related injuries that all covered employers must report to OSHA. Previously, employers had to report the following to OSHA:

  • All work-related fatalities
  • Work-related hospitalizations of three or more employees

Starting in 2015, employers will have to report the following to OSHA:

  • All work-related fatalities
  • All work-related inpatient hospitalizations of one or more employees
  • All work-related amputations
  • All work-related losses of an eye

All employers under OSHA jurisdiction must report all work-related fatalities, hospitalizations, amputations and losses of an eye to OSHA, even employers who are exempt from routinely keeping OSHA injury and illness records due to company size or industry.

https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping2014/OSHA3745.pdf

As of January 1, 2015, all employers must report

  • All work-related fatalities within 8 hours.
  • All work-related inpatient hospitalizations, all amputations and all losses of an eye within 24 hours.

As of January 1, 2015, all employers must report

  • All work-related fatalities within 8 hours.
  • All work-related inpatient hospitalizations, all amputations and all losses of an eye within 24 hours.

As of January 1, 2015, all employers must report

  • All work-related fatalities within 8 hours.
  • All work-related inpatient hospitalizations, all amputations and all losses of an eye within 24 hours.

OSHA Penalties

Effective August 1, 2016

 

OSHA’s maximum penalties, which were last adjusted in 1990, will increase by 78%. Going forward, the agency will continue to adjust its penalties for inflation each year based on the Consumer Price Index. The new penalties will take effect after August 1, 2016. Any citations issued by OSHA on or after that date will be subject to the new penalties if the related violations occurred after November 2, 2015. OSHA’s top penalty for serious violations rise from $7,000 to $12,471 and its top penalty for willful or repeated violations rises from $70,000 to $124,709.

https://www.osha.gov/Publications/OSHA3879.pdf

 

OSHA Recordkeeping

Effective August 10, 2016

Under the new rule, all establishments with 250 or more employees in industries covered by the recordkeeping regulation must electronically submit to OSHA injury and illness information from OSHA Forms 300, 300A, and 301. Establishments with 20-249 employees in certain industries must electronically submit information from OSHA Form 300A only. The new requirements take effect Aug. 10, 2016, with phased in data submissions beginning in 2017. These requirements do not add to or change an employer’s obligation to complete and retain injury and illness records under the Recording and Reporting Occupational Injuries and Illnesses regulation.

The final rule is available on Federal Register at: https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2016/05/20/2016-11817/improve-tracking-of-workplace-injuries-and-illnesses-correction